Cloud-based solutions to ensure BPO operations during calamities

Posted at 08/22/2012 7:53 AM | Updated as of 08/22/2012 8:07 AM

MANILA, Philippines - The Philippine business-process outsourcing (BPO) industry, because of the numerous typhoons that are visiting the country every year, needs to shift further to cloud-based solutions to ensure continuity of service, American technology provider inContact said.

Junie Pama, country manager of inContact, said disruption of operations similar to what happened from August 6 to 8 due to widespread flooding in Metro Manila and nearby provinces has already put in question the reliability of the Philippines as an outsourcing destination.

“Disruption in BPO operations in times of calamities is the biggest threat to the industry, which is emerging as the most vibrant sector of the Philippine economy. Why risk the country’s competitive advantage in the BPO space, when there is a solution available,” Pama said in a statement.

He said shifting to cloud-based solutions rather than sticking to premised-based solutions will diminish the risk of work stoppage of BPO firms.

Pama said inContact is now offering its cloud-based disaster-recovery program (DRP) that allows BPO companies and customer-support agents to remain in contact with their clients, even during a natural disaster.

He said call centers and BPOs, without a DRP, are highly exposed to natural disasters and are most likely to experience hardware failures and disruption of business operations.

“inContact’s flexible cloud-based DRP solutions can address the problem, because these solutions are hosted in multiple sites, unlike the premise-based technologies, which are highly exposed to natural disasters,” he said.

The DRP solutions include geographic redundancy, which ensures that even if one hosting site goes down, all functionality switches over to the second site. “It guarantees a 99.99-percent uptime and offers flexible connectivity options, which ensure that companies get calls to agents even if some options are failing,” Pama said.