Bishop blames RH law for rise in Internet porn

Posted at 01/19/2014 6:12 PM

MANILA -- Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo attributed Internet pornography patronage in part to the Reproductive Health (RH) Law.

In a report from the CBCP News, Pabillo blasted the “culture of addiction,” which he said is rooted on the promotion of condoms, contraceptives and the law itself.

He also urged the government to teach the "sacredness" of sex.

“It is saddening that the government said it would combat pornography but it itself promotes pills and condoms that encourages relationships outside marriages and extra marital affairs. It is not right and they should be consistent,” he said.

Pabillo also blamed poverty for the rise in Internet pornography.

“It is because of poverty among our people that pushes them to cyber pornography and it should be addressed sincerely. What is happening is that most parents were unable to provide education for their siblings causing ignorance that eventually drives their children to cyber pornography to make a living,” he said.

On Thursday, foreign police said they had dismantled a pedophile ring that streamed live sexual abuse of Filipino children as young as six over the Internet, with victims' parents involved in some cases.

Fifteen victims aged between six and 15 have been rescued as part of Operation Endeavor, Britain's National Crime Agency said, adding that 29 people had been arrested, including 11 in the Philippines.

Three other ongoing investigations into pedophiles who pay to see abuse via webcams have identified 733 suspects, the agency added, warning of a "significant and emerging threat" in developing nations.

Under Operation Endeavor, British police worked alongside counterparts in the Philippines and Australia.

"This is part of our intensified efforts to end this scourge... of live streaming of child sexual abuse" to order by foreign pedophiles, said Senior Superintendent Gilbert Sosa, head of the Philippine police's anti-cybercrime unit.

"This has become a major problem in the Philippines, where in some cases even the parents are involved," he told AFP, declining to give specific details that could compromise ongoing operations.

Sosa said severe poverty had forced many youngsters into prostitution or into working in so-called cybersex dens, a booming business believed to be focused on the central island of Cebu. – With reports from Agence France-Presse