California Pinoys cope with drought emergency

Posted at 02/01/2014 10:09 AM

LOS ANGELES – Weeks after California Governor Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency in the state and urged residents to reduce their water consumption by at least 20 percent, some kababayans in Los Angeles are doing exactly what he said.

“To not to run the water so much – when they are brushing the teeth, we turn the water off, when we attempt to wash dishes, we’ll turn the water off while we are soaping,” Los Angeles resident Jayne Bernardo said. “We try to do little things like that to try to save as much as we can.”

California, the most populous state in the US and home to an estimated 43 percent of Filipino-Americans, is having another dry year for the third straight year. With the duration of the drought still undetermined, many are left worried.

“It may not only affect me but can also affect my kids later on in the future,” Bernardo said.

Bernardo said she does not only teach her two children how to conserve water but also emphasizes on the importance of not wasting our natural resources.

“We have to start preparing now in order for us to save for the future generations,” she said.

According to the California Department of Food and Agriculture, the state produces almost half of the US grown fruits, vegetables, and nuts and about seven percent of the nation’s livestock.

With the current drought situation, experts believe that this could impact food inflation in the nation and in the world.

“When this terrible droughts hit and production drops, this echoes around the globe,” Climatologist Bill Patzert explained.

“It worries me because the pricing can go up and I may not be able to afford it,” Bernado said.

For Romeo San Jose, drought in California is nothing new and he can certainly make adjustments to his way of life, just like in the past.

“We’re not really that concerned about this,” San Jose said. “We’ve been living here for 40 years and we know how to deal with this.”

Some parts of the Southern California saw some rain this week, but it was not enough for any drought relief that the state currently needs.