Crafting of cybercrime law IRR on hold

Posted at 10/10/2012 10:16 AM | Updated as of 10/10/2012 1:24 PM

But info drive on Republic Act 10175 continues

MANILA - The Department of Justice (DOJ) has to put on hold the crafting of the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) of Republic Act (RA) No. 10175, also known as the Cybercrime Prevention Act, following the issuance of a 120-day temporary restraining order (TRO) by the Supreme Court (SC) on the implementation of the controversial legislation.

However, Justice Secretary Leila De Lima said the department will continue with its awareness campaign to disseminate information regarding the law which was signed by Pres. Aquino just last Sept. 12.

“The TRO would encompass the implementation of the entire law. Since the adoption of the IRR is in the law, then hold na muna yun pero yung advocacy, hindi covered yun... We will still undertake awareness raising campaign to educate the people on the salient features of the law and to explain to them that there is nothing to worry in the implementation of the law,” she said.

The justice chief also pointed out that the complaint of a 17-year-old girl who first invoked the Cybercrime Law, for the proliferation of her alleged sex video in cyberspace, may still prosper as it is still covered by other laws, including Republic Act (RA) No. 9995 or the Anti-Photo and Video Voyeurism Act.

De Lima said the DOJ will continue with its ministerial duty of accepting complaints, even for violations of the Cybercrime Prevention Act, in spite of the TRO. However, these complaints may not be subjected to preliminary investigation while the temporary relief stays.

On Tuesday, the high court unanimously ruled on the issuance of the TRO and set oral arguments on Jan. 15 on the 15 petitions filed against RA 10175.