Pacquiao drops out of Forbes Celebrity 100

Posted at 05/20/2011 11:51 PM | Updated as of 05/21/2011 5:35 PM

MANILA, Philippines – Filipino boxing sensation and congressman Manny “Pacman” Pacquiao failed to make it to the 2011 Forbes Celebrity 100 after being part of the list the past two years.

Pacquiao, boxing’s pound-for-pound king, was ranked 55th in 2010 and 57th in 2009.

Pacquiao didn't make it on the list despite the guaranteed US$20 million he received for his bout against former boxing champion Shane Mosley.

Forbes Celebrity 100 is an annual list compiled and published by Forbes magazine, which ranks the 100 most powerful celebrities of the year.

The celebrities were ranked based on their entertainment-related earnings, media visibility, and social media power.

Factors that were taken into account include income, Google hits, fan base, press clips and magazine covers.

Timeline

Timeline may have played a factor in Pacquiao’s non-inclusion in the list. Forbes considered only the income earned from May 1, 2010 to May 1, 2011.

In 2009, Forbes counted his earnings from his two fights against Oscar dela Hoya and Ricky Hatton.

In 2010, Forbes included Pacquiao's earnings from his fights against Joshua Clottey and Miguel Cotto.

The only fight that Pacquiao had in Forbes’ timeline this year was the one against Antonio Margarito, for which he reportedly earned at least $20 million.

His bout against Mosley, held May 7, missed the cut. Pacquiao made least $20 million for that fight.

Tiger Woods remains on top

Despite his problems both on and off the golf course, Tiger Woods remained the most powerful athlete in the world, ranking 6th on the list.

Other athletes on the list are NBA players LeBron James (10th) and Kobe Bryant (14th), tennis star Roger Federer (25th), and football stars David Beckham (35th) and Cristiano Ronaldo (43th).

Pacquiao was not the only athlete who failed to make the cut.

Cyclist Lance Armstrong, basketball legend Michael Jordan, and fellow boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr. were also dropped from the list. -- With reports from AFP and Forbes.com.